Hip Hop deejays Stretch Armstrong (right) aka Adrian Bartos and Bobbito (left) aka Robert Garcia became legends on The Stretch Armstrong Show during the 1990s. Back then, they were hip hop tastemakers on college station WKCR in New York City. Now they're back together hosting "What's Good? With Stretch and Bobbito," an NPR podcast. Nickolai Hammar/NPR/. hide caption

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Nickolai Hammar/NPR/.

Stretch & Bobbito On Race, Hip-Hop, And Belonging

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Canvasser Ana Mejia gathers her supplies at the offices of the National Council of La Raza in Miami in 2016. The NCLR renamed itself UnidosUS this month, causing a rift in the U.S. Latino community. Some see it as shedding a dated name, but others see it as leaving a legacy behind. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

The Largest U.S. Latino Advocacy Group Changes Its Name, Sparking Debate

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Bao Phi hopes his poetry book Thousand Star Hotel and his children's book A Different Pond can fill the hole in Asian-American literature that he saw when he was a kid. Anna Min/Courtesy of Capstone Publishing hide caption

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Anna Min/Courtesy of Capstone Publishing

Chairman and CEO Linda Johnson Rice speaks at Ebony magazine's Power 100 Gala at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif., last December. Earl Gibson III/Getty Images hide caption

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Earl Gibson III/Getty Images

#EbonyOwes: 99 Problems And Money Is One

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"For nearly half a century, I've tracked Hollywood's Arabs and Muslims. Almost always I found that they've appeared as villains," Jack Shaheen said in a talk at the National Press Club in March 2017. Washington Report on Middle East Affairs/YouTube hide caption

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Washington Report on Middle East Affairs/YouTube

Octavia Butler at home. A lifelong bibliophile, she considered libraries sacred spaces. (c) Patti Perret/The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens hide caption

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(c) Patti Perret/The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

Octavia Butler: Writing Herself Into The Story

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The Slants' frontman, Simon Tam, filed the original lawsuit after the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office kept the band from registering its name. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

What's Next For The Founder Of The Slants, And The Fight Over Racial Slurs

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The Code Switch podcast is celebrating its first anniversary. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

From Mourning to 'Moonlight': A Year In Race, As Told By Code Switch

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Elvis Presley, in the studio in 1956 — Presley's success was undoubtedly driven by the material he appropriated from black musicians. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

Protesters gather outside the state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., Friday, June 16, 2017, after St. Anthony police officer Jeronimo Yanez was cleared in the fatal shooting of Philando Castile. Steve Karnowski/AP hide caption

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Steve Karnowski/AP

What To Make Of Philando Castile's Death, One Year Later

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Solána Rowe, aka SZA, released one of 2017's most anticipated albums on Friday. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Demonstrators hold up a Pan-African flag to protest the killing of teenager Michael Brown on Aug. 12, 2014 in Ferguson, Mo. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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On Flag Day, Remembering The Red, Black And Green

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Guess Who's Coming to Dinner arrived in theaters six months to the day after interracial marriage was legalized by the Loving v. Virginia Supreme Court decision in 1967. Above, Sidney Poitier, Katharine Houghton and Spencer Tracy. George Rinhart/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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George Rinhart/Corbis via Getty Images

50 Years After 'Loving,' Hollywood Still Struggles With Interracial Romance

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Bill Cosby walks outside the courtroom during a break on the third day of his sexual assault trial in the Montgomery County Courthouse June 7, 2017 in Norristown, Pa. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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"Racial impostor syndrome" is definitely a thing for many people. We hear from biracial and multi-ethnic listeners who connect with feeling "fake" or inauthentic in some part of their racial or ethnic heritage. Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

'Racial Impostor Syndrome': Here Are Your Stories

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American Muslim shop owner waits for customers as he sells different types of lanterns for sale as part of preparations for the Holy Month of Ramadan in Bayridge neighborhood in Brooklyn borough of New York, United States on May 24, 2017. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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