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Researchers have won a prize for discovering that a cow's genetics determine which microbes populate its gut. Some of those microbes produce the greenhouse gas methane that comes out of cow belches and farts and ends up in the atmosphere. Charlie Litchfield/AP hide caption

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Charlie Litchfield/AP

David Wildy, a prominent Arkansas farmer, in a field of soybeans that were damaged by dicamba. He says that "farmers need this technology. But right is right and wrong is wrong. And when you let a technology, a pesticide or whatever, get on your neighbor, it's not right. We can't do that." Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Arkansas Defies Monsanto, Moves To Ban Rogue Weedkiller

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How Prepared Is The U.S. For Earthquakes?

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A jet emanating from galaxy M87 can be seen in this July 6, 2000, photo taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. J.A. Biretta, Hubble Heritage Team/NASA hide caption

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J.A. Biretta, Hubble Heritage Team/NASA

A duck-billed dinosaur skeleton, which the researchers think ate crustaceans, on display in 2009 at the Venetian Resort Hotel Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Rescue workers search for earthquake survivors in Mexico City on Wednesday. Miguel Tovar/AP hide caption

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Miguel Tovar/AP

Mexico City Doomed By Its Geology To More Earthquakes

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Kathy Niakan, a developmental biologist at the Francis Crick Institute in London, used the CRISPR gene editing technique to find out how a gene affects the growth of human embryos. Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute

Editing Embryo DNA Yields Clues About Early Human Development

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Affordable Care Act navigators helped guide those looking for insurance during an enrollment event at San Antonio's Southwest General Hospital last year. Beyond helping with initial enrollment, navigators often follow up with help later, as an applicant's income or job status changes. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Sophia Spencer and Morgan Jackson co-wrote a scientific paper on Twitter, entomology and women in science, after a tweet about Sophia's love for bugs went viral. Courtesy of Nicole Spencer hide caption

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Courtesy of Nicole Spencer

Once Teased For Her Love Of Bugs, 8-Year-Old Co-Authors Scientific Paper

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A map in Where the Animals Go shows how baboons move near the Mpala Research Centre in Kenya, as tracked by anthropologist Margaret Crofoot and her colleagues in 2012. Margaret Crofoot, University of California, Davis; Damien Farine, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology /Courtesy of Oliver Uberti hide caption

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Margaret Crofoot, University of California, Davis; Damien Farine, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology /Courtesy of Oliver Uberti

Oysters, shown out of their shell, collect tiny plastic particles while in the water. These microplastics can eventually make their way into your dinner. Ken Christensen/KCTS Television hide caption

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Ken Christensen/KCTS Television

While benzodiazepines and SSRI antidepressants are not risk-free, says Yale psychiatrist Kimberly Yonkers, "it should be reassuring that we're not seeing a huge magnitude of an effect here" on pregnancy. Hanna Barczyk for NPR hide caption

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Xanax Or Zoloft For Moms-To-Be: A New Study Assesses Safety

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